Archbishop of Dhaka visits Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh

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Archbishop of Dhaka, Cardinal Patrick D’Rozario, paid a visit to the Rohingya refugee camps. The archbishop’s visit on September 24, 25 was a gesture to express solidarity with the Rohingya refugees.

Archbishop of Dhaka

The Archbishop of Dhaka reflecting about his visit to the refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar said: “I wanted to be with them, to be together with them, to share in my own way, their pain; and importantly, to prepare a. way for Caritas to go to serve them.”

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There are more than 600,000 Rohingya refugees in the refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar. These refugees had settled here as a result of exoduses that unfolded in 1978, 1991, 2012, and the ongoing crisis.

Speaking about his visit to the Rohingya refugee camps, Archbishop of Dhaka said that: “[On Sunday] I visited four camps, the biggest one has one hundred thousand refugees. This is an old camp but there are new and recent arrivals. I touched the wounds of Jesus in the camps. This is a humanitarian suffering, we suffer with these people, my heart weeps for our people, so much suffering.”

“[On Monday] morning I visited a refugee camp, where there are around thirty thousand refugees, most of them live in makeshift sites without proper shelter and have only a plastic sheet for a roof, without clean drinking water and sanitation. They have limited food supplies but nothing else,” the Archbishop continued.

“There is such suffering. I see in the faces of young children, of young women with babies in their arms, of the elderly, the sick – so much suffering,” he said, adding, “I wanted to be with them, to be together with them, to share, in my own way, their pain; and importantly, to prepare a way for Caritas to go to serve them.”

The Archbishop was encouraged by the efforts being taken in order to help these refugees. “I am encouraged by the steps being taken by the NGOs and the government. After the shock of seeing the conditions of the refugees, things in the camps seem to be getting organized, but there is so much to do.”

He said that there were no Christians in the refugee camps: “The Church is not present here at all. People here have never seen a church or a priest. Nonetheless, he said that the Church is with these suffering people.