Debris of Humanity: Photos of dead body of a 3-year-old Syrian boy found at a sea shore in Turkey rock the world

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Syrian refugee boy

Dead body of a 3-year-old found at a seashore in Turkey.

According to CNN, dead body of a 3-year-old was found lying face down, his head to one side with his bottom slightly up. This toddler wearing a red T-shirt, blue pants and tiny shoes was one of 12 people who drowned off Turkey in an attempt to reach Greece. The migrants were washed up on a beach Wednesday, September 2.

The news of this has rocked the world as a photo of him lying alone and being approached by an official has been shared extensively around the world. His photos are being shared with Twitter hashtag #KıyıyaVuranİnsanlık or “Flotsam of Humanity” in Turkish.

Syrian refugee

Also read: Europe’s biggest migrant crisis since World War II

Recently, Europe is witnessing a major migrant crisis, as tens and thousands are pouring in from war-zones. The crisis is severe to such an extent that there has never been one since the World War II. Human rights activists are speculating that photos of him could be a defining moment in the debate over how to handle the flow of people en route to Europe. According to media reports, details, the 3-year-old boy and his family were Kurds from Syria attempting to get to relatives in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Dead body of a syrian refugee

In an attempt to reach Europe approximately more than 2,600 people have lost their lives trying to cross the Mediterranean this year. This route to Europe has now become the most deadly migrant crossing point in the world, according to the International Organization for Migration. Moreover, the organisation also issued warning that the number of deaths was towering.

On the other hand, Turkish authorities have stated that the Turkish rescue teams were able to save some people aboard the boats. Two men and a child who were travelling in the group are missing.

In pursuit of safer and better life, some of these migrants have drowned. Some have been crushed in stampedes, while some have been suffocated by boat engine fumes. Federico Soda, IOM Director for the Mediterranean region says, “In the last few weeks we have seen many deaths. We think that this may be explained by the fact that the smugglers are becoming increasingly violent and cruel.”