Dr. Paul Bhatti campaigning for repeal of blasphemy law in Pakistan

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Dr. Paul Bhatti

Former Pakistani Christian Minister for National Harmony and Minorities’ Affairs Dr. Paul Bhatti takes on a campaign against the blasphemy law in Pakistan.

News is that Dr. Paul Bhatti, a Pakistani Christian is campaigning against the blasphemy law in Pakistan. Dr. Bhatti who is a former Federal Minister for National Harmony and Minorities’ Affairs and also brother of the Pakistani Christian politician Shahbaz Bhatti (late) spoke to media during a recent conference about the persecution of Christians.

Shahbaz Bhatti who was a champion rights defender of Pakistani Christians and the most active campaigner against the blasphemy law was gunned by militants on March 2, 2011; being termed as a “blasphemer” by the militants. “My life and profession changed after the assassination of my brother,” Dr. Bhatti said.

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Dr. Paul Bhatti who had no intention of sneaking into Pakistani politics worked as a surgeon doctor prior to his brother’s assassination. “That was a situation I never expected to be in,” he said while adding serenely “I was not aspiring to be a politician, but it happened. I think God’s ways are different, and it happened.”

After his brother’s assassination, Dr. Bhatti was appointed as the Minister for National Harmony and Minorities’ Affairs while at he same time he founded a trust in Shabaz Bhatti’s name.

While talking with the media, Dr. Bhatti clarified that there is generally a wrong perception that Christians in Pakistan are associated with the West. This is the very reason that the Christians in Pakistan are suffering persecution in their own homeland. “The West is considered like a Christian, and Christian people somehow seem to represent the West. A lot of people have hatred in their hearts against the West.”

Dr. Bhatti who is currently living in Pakistan as well as in Italy is campaigning for the annulment of the notorious blasphemy law in Pakistan, which was first introduced by the British before the partition.