Egypt: Majority of educated Christians flee from the country as persecution rises

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Egyptian Christians

Egyptian Christians are increasingly fleeing from Egypt amid growing persecution in the country.

According to anti-persecution organisation Release International, Egyptian Christians are under attack amid growing anti-Christian violence as they are being driven out of their homes because of their Christian faith.

The anti-persecution organisation Release Chief Executive, Paul Robinson said, “One of the families we met was forced to flee after the father had been brutally gunned down in front of his teenage son. The pretext for the violence? A dispute over shop prices.

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Another man we met was thrown into prison for trying to create a room for his Sunday school, which had been meeting in the open air. He and his children received death threats – and still are – and his father was detained and tortured.

Despite changes to the constitution, freedom of religion is still way beyond the grasp of many Egyptians – especially in remote areas away from Cairo. What we’re seeing today is a modern day exodus from Egypt, as Christians are leaving the Middle East in droves.

Yet Egypt’s Coptic community is still the largest Christian presence in the Middle East. It would be a tragedy if they felt compelled to leave. Release International is calling on Christians everywhere to stand with them this week in prayer,” said Robinson.

Nonetheless, the Release International is urging Egypt to practically implement the recent legal guarantee of freedom of religion in practice provided by the Egyptian constitution. Furthermore, British and Irish Christians are being urged by the organisation to “stand with Egyptian Christians in prayer.”

On the other hand, the Evangelical Fellowship of Egypt states that religion based persecution and terrorism has caused majority of able and best Christians to leave the country.

Fouad Youssef, who is a former Evangelical Fellowship secretary general, “Many families and educated people in the churches have left, escaping an unknown future for their children – especially after the period of burning churches and killing Christians in 2013. We have lost many of our good leaders, fleeing to the States, Canada and Europe. And this affects our ministry, our population and our leadership capabilities in Egypt.”