Flood Affected Christians Deprived Of Government Aid

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ISLAMABAD: Monsoon and flood having dire effects in areas across the country.

Flood in Pakistan
Flood in Pakistan

In line with details, Monsoon rains are causing trouble in all four provinces with death toll rising to 118. The deluge has certainly wrecked the recent heat wave and many are enjoying the cooler climate yet masses have been left homeless by relentless torrents.

 

Consistent with data released by the Provincial Disaster Management Authority (PDMA) of all the four provinces, over 1,745 villages have been submerged, damaging nearly 30,000 homes. Subsequently, safe spots and make-shift homes have sprung up in every province, with a total of 94 relief camps set up accommodating over 9,200 flood affected people.

 

Nevertheless, according to a version by a local activist, “Water has rushed into the slum areas of Islamabad. Islamabad has so far received the highest levels of rainfall, calculated around 128 millimetres and Rawalpindi’s rainfall is close to 68 millimetres.

 

The activist continues,” Christians, who comprise most of the slum area dwellers, are facing serious challenges, as they grapple with the loss of household items, damaged homes, and often unusable roads. There is also a lack of food in some areas and little or no shelter in the hardest hit areas.”
 

His narration continues, “In addition, water stored in large vats since 2008, has been released to make room for the new rainfall. Strange as it may seem, it appears that a local Muslim cleric has control of some of the city’s water storage.”

 

“Despite pleas from the Christian community, the cleric opened the water sheds to direct the flow of excess water towards the Christian colony which is in direct line of the flow of water,” the yarn continues.

 

Great volume of water gushing out of the vent as the vats were opened; caused further problems already caused by the monsoons.

 

“The damaged Christian communities are upset that government aid is not arriving in their areas. They believe they are being overlooked by the government and NGO’s,” he complains.