Gender-Based Violence on Rise in Pakistan

769

The outlook of gender-based violence, in relation to persecution of Christians in Muslim lands is an ever challenging subject because of several factors, some of them being:

 

  • The unavailability of statistical information
  • The silence of the victims
  • The severity of the abuses, which are sometimes lethal.

 

 

Gender based violence in Pakistan
Gender based violence in Pakistan

 

Cumulative reports, of gender based violence against Christian females normally, do not exist. At the same time, tracing and meeting enough victims to prepare sizable case studies is overwhelming, if not impossible. To a certain extent, referring to possibly uncertain statistics from various small organizations, let us review cases of general gender abuse in four particular Muslim countries: Iran, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and Egypt.

 

 

These states are critically and closely observed than most others, and a number of human rights organizations, along with government agencies such as the US Department of State, are keenly monitoring them. The facts thus provided by these groups are reliable. Intermittently, some of the cases are even covered by the international media.

 

 

Meanwhile, mushrooming Christian persecution in general is reasonably well documented internationally by watchdog groups, whilst statistical information from trustworthy organizations such as Open Doors, International Christian Concern and various Catholic outreaches can be accessed online. Since Christians, are regarded as objectionable minorities in these countries, therefore subjected to acute discrimination, oppression and violence. Traditionally women in these countries are treated as second class citizens however; Christian females are in even severe crisis than Muslims, as they are the weakest members of an “infidel,” outcast population.

 

 Pakistan now has the arguable characteristic of being “one of the world’s most tarnished hotbeds of Christian persecution.” 

 

Nothing like Saudi Arabia and Iran, though it has an unquestionable Islamist constitution, yet the government does not enjoys full command over its population. In preference, Pakistan tends to turn a blind eye to Christian persecution, or else silently winks at the hoodlums who carry it out. For that reason, even if absurdly the state itself is not directly involved and censurable for most of the persecution of Pakistani Christians that takes place; it is over and over again inferred to it.

 

 

As an alternative of official legal constraint, mobs and random specific militias render their own versions of Islamist law often resulting in fierce and deadly assaults, despite the fact that the state utterly fails to protect the victims. At times the police take action against these perpetrators. The courts may even pronounce them guilty of criminal violence even murder, yet the offenders are generally quietly released within days.

 

 

Girls in Pakistan convey the impression of being an alluring target for abuse. In a recent report,Raymond Ibrahim-  a Coptic-American writer and Associate Fellow at the Middle East Forum, described 22 cases of viciousness against Pakistani Christian girls.

 

Mentioning a handful Ibrahim’s  cases,

1- Gulfam,  9-year-old Christian girl, abused in (December, 2010).

2- Lubna, a 12-year-old Christian girl was kidnapped, abused, and murdered. (October, 2010).

3-12-year-old Christian girl Anna, abused then forcibly converted and “married” to her Muslim attacker.
(October, 2011).

3-A teenage Christian girl, Amariah, murdered after an attempt to abuse.  (December, 2011).

4- A 14-year-old Christian girl, Mehek, abducted at gunpoint from her house.

(August, 2011).

 

 

These cases – exclusively related to female Christian children – are far from hidden incidents. Instead, they characterize the kinds of violence faced by girls and women of all ages who belong to Christian minorities.