Germany: A Church to remove its croses, altar and pulpit to house Muslim refugees

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Church in Germany

A Church in Germany all set to facilitate the Muslim refugees who would be taking refuge in the church building.

According to details, in Oberhausen, Germany a church has taken up the task to provide shelter to a group of 50 Muslim refugees. For the sake of making them feel comfortable, the church administration will be removing crosses, altars and pulpits before the refugees would start living in the church.

The church administration has decided to take these steps in order to make the Muslim refugees feel welcomed. In this regard, Pastor Joachim Deterding stated, “Before the refugees can move in, the seats have to be taken away. Also the altar, the pulpit and font are movable.”

Moreover, the church administration will also be providing all necessary facilities for daily life. In addition to this, washing machines will also be installed at the church open place. A German newspaper Handelsblatt reports that the church administration will also be providing the refugees with meals.

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The spokesperson of Oberhausen, Rainer Suhr said: “The parish had offered that to the city. We accept it gladly.”
Earlier this month, the Bishop of Stockholm Eva Brunne had issued orders to a church in her diocese to eliminate all signs of the cross to make the building “more inviting” for Muslim refugees.

Eva Brunne further said, “It is important that there are places for praying sisters and brothers and we show hospitality and tolerance, regardless of faith. Good people of different beliefs must be able to meet and help each other.”

Bishop Eva also made controversial comments and came under fire and had to face heavy criticism. She commented that the direction of Mecca should be marked and further got entangled in controversy when she termed the Muslim refugees “angels”. Soon after these comments, a priest of the diocese of Bishop Eva branded her “theologically unthinking”.

On the other hand, Father Patrik Pettersson reacted and said, “The only argument bishop Eva really put forward in support of her view is ‘hospitality’ How do you respond to that? Not much of a basis for discussion, as one colleague put it. The theological, ecclesiological, pastoral and working issues are left untouched.”