Jordan: An Iraqi priest houses hundreds of Christian and Muslim refugees from Iraq

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Iraqi Christians

An Iraqi priest provides shelter to hundreds of Iraqi Christians displaced by terror group ISIS.

According to details, an Iraqi priest Father Khalil Jaar in the Marka, a town of Jordan has housed many Christian refugees from Iraq. Under his tender care, children of these refugees receive education in the complex of St. Mary’s church.

Father Khalil, originally comes from Bethlehem, has provided shelter for Christians and Muslim refugees alike. About 500 families of refugees from Iraq, Syria and Jordan have found safe haven here.

Iraqi Christians majority of them from Mosul, arrived here seeking asylum. Some of the refugees reckon, Jordan as a transit to Europe. When they reach Jordan, individuals like Father Khalil greet them with mercy and kindness.

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As a direct result of advance of ISIS, about 2,200 Christians from Iraq have found refuge in Jordan. This is predominantly, because of a contract which was secured last year between the king of Jordan Abdullah and Father Nour al-Qusmusa, and the government of Jordan.

It is due to this agreement that, Father Nour has permission from the government of Iraq, to sponsor Iraqi families openly. Moreover, he provides them aid through the channel of Caritas.

However, it is an obligation for the Iraqi refugees to obtain a visa in order to enter Jordan, while Syrian refugees do not require a visa. Moreover, no sponsorship from church or a Jordanian family is requires for Syrians while Iraqis require them.

At the same time, Iraqi refugees are lesser in number as compared to Syrian refugees. Currently, at the At St. Mary’s church about nine refugee families are taking refuge. This shelter is being run by the aid generated by local Jordanians. Aid includes clothes, toys, furniture items etc. What is more, Father Khalil, has given up his own office to accommodate a refugee family which is currently residing in his office. Apart from these nine, many refugee families are taking refuge in apartments around the town.