Paris attacks: Refugees from Syria no longer welcomed, 27 states of America say

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Syrian refugees

In the wake of deadly attacks in Paris, 27 states of America oppose taking in Syria refugees.

Followed by terrorist attacks in Paris, more than half of the American states’ governors have expressed opposition to letting in refugees from Syria. The 27 states which had opposed the refugee intake include Alabama, Georgia, Texas, Arizona, Michigan, Illinois, Maine, New Hampshire and others.

Despite the opposition from the states; the Federal government remains the final authority over the issue. Moreover, among the states which have protested against letting in Syrian refugees there is only one Republican governor.

This opposition comes as a result of the fact that at least one among the attackers entered Europe in disguise of a refugee from Syria. It has been reported that this attacker from ISIS namely Ahmad al Muhammad, had fallaciously identified himself as a refugee from Syria. He entered into Europe via Greece in October earlier this year.

Moreover, the governors who are of the opinion that the Syrian refugees should not be welcomed in the United States claim that the refugees coming from Syria should be screened cautiously as they pose a potential threat to the national security.

Also Read: US should take in only Christian refugees from Syria says Rep. Jeb Bush

Since 2011, so far United States has admitted about 1,500 Syrian refugees, however, nonetheless, in the wake of recent conflict in Middle East; the Obama administration announced earlier in September that about 10,000 refugees from Syria will be allowed to enter America next year.

Seeing a backlash of Paris attacks, the Council on American-Islamic Relations stated, “Defeating ISIS involves projecting American ideals to the world. Governors who reject those fleeing war and persecution abandon our ideals and instead project our fears to the world.”

Nonetheless, the Federal government has the final say whether to admit Syrian refugees or not. The states do not have a final authority in this regard, even though, the states individually can make the acceptance of refugees a lot more difficult.

While reflecting about the denial of American states to admit Syrian refugees into U.S. Stephen I. Vladeck – American University law professor says, “Legally, states have no authority to do anything because the question of who should be allowed in this country is one that the Constitution commits to the federal government.”

But without the state’s participation, the federal government would have a much more arduous task. So a state can’t say it is legally objecting, but it can refuse to cooperate, which makes thing much more difficult.”