Religious Minorites And Human Rights Conference

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KARACHI: Leaders from religious minorities express concerns about forced conversions in a ceremony on “Religious Minority and Human Rights.”

 

Religious Minorites and Human Rights
Religious Minorites and Human Rights

 
Guest speakers at this meeting on minority rights said that religious prejudice and acts like forced conversions should be confirmed as “crimes against humanity” wherefore; legal action should be taken to restrain it.

 

Addressing the ceremony on ‘Religious Minority and Human Rights: Democratic  Process and New Opportunities’, the speakers emphasized on the need to formulate laws for ending bias against browbeaten sections including non-Muslims, who are otherwise alienated in the Pakistani society.

 
At this occasion, Minority candidates, who competed in the Elections-2013; from general electorates in Sindh, civil society activists, human rights activists, media persons and members of minority  groups, contributed in the discussion. They also shared their experience of the elections and gave their suggestions on the electoral process largely including the problems faced by the minority voters, experiences of candidates themselves and manoeuvring of results by the influential.
 
Michel Javed said, “On the polling day in Karachi minority candidates faced many difficulties, not a single political party has given tickets to minority women on reserved seats for women.” He further recommended to fix reserved seats for women of religious minority, “who may also reach assemblies,“he said.
 
The participants additionally shared that in Tharparkar and Umerkot districts there are more than 40 % voters of religious minority; however candidates from minorities had to face a great deal of problems during their elections campaign.
 
Their voters were blocked from polling. Certain landlords compellingly collected their CNICs whilst preventing them from voting, they complained. In the face of this violence, they said that the candidates along with their supporters acknowledged the significance of minority votes. They complained that there is almost 100 percent illiteracy among the sidelined religious minorities in rural Sindh.