Trump can be the last chance for Republicans and conservative white Christians to step back from the declination!

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Trump Can’t Reverse the decline of White Christian America.

Those who voted for the president felt it could be the last chance to stop the downward movement of white Christians in America. But his victory will not arrest the cultural and demographic trends they opposed.
In 2016, presidential campaign was a claim about the America’s changing demographics and culture had brought the country to a precipice. He repeatedly made his people believe that he can be the last chance for Republicans and conservative white Christians to step back from the declination, to preserve their power and way of life.

Those who voted for the president felt it could be the last chance to stop the downward movement of white Christians in America. But his victory will not arrest the cultural and demographic trends they opposed.
In 2016, presidential campaign was a claim about the America’s changing demographics and culture had brought the country to a precipice. He repeatedly made his people believe that he can be the last chance for Republicans and conservative white Christians to step back from the declination, to preserve their power and way of life.

In an interview on Pat Robertson’s Christian Broadcasting Network (CBN) in early September, Trump put the choice starkly for the channel’s conservative Christian viewers: “If we don’t win this election, you’ll never see another Republican and you’ll have a whole different church structure.”

Asked to explain, Trump proceeded,

“I think this will be the last election that the Republicans have a chance of winning because you’re going to have people flowing across the border, you’re going to have illegal immigrants coming in and they’re going to be legalized and they’re going to be able to vote, and once that all happens you can forget it.”

Even Michele Bachmann, a member of Trump’s evangelical executive advisory board, supported the trump’s statement by saying that, “If you look at the numbers of people who vote and who lives [sic] in the country and who Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton want to bring in to the country, this is the last election when we even have a chance to vote for somebody who will stand up for godly moral principles. This is it.”

Trump’s intense appeal to 2016 as the “last chance” election seems to have spurred conservative white Christian voters to turn out to vote at particularly high rates.

Despite the outcome of the 2016 elections, the key long-term trends indicate White Christian America’s decline is continuing unabated. Over the last eight years, the percentage of Americans who identify as white and Christian fell 11 percentage points, and support for same-sex marriage jumped 18 percentage points.

One of the most intricate features of the 2016 election was the high level of support Donald Trump received from white evangelical Protestants. How did a group that once proudly identified itself as “values voters” agreed to support a person who had been married three times, cursed from the campaign stump, owned casinos, appeared on the cover of Playboy Magazine, and most remarkably, was caught on tape bragging in the most graphic terms about habitually grabbing women’s genitals without their permission? White evangelical voters’ attraction to Trump was even more mysterious because the early GOP presidential field offered candidates with strong evangelical credentials, such as Ted Cruz, a longtime Southern Baptist whose father was a Baptist minister, and Marco Rubio, a conservative Catholic who could talk with ease and familiarity about his own personal relationship with Jesus.

Jerry Falwell Jr. of Liberty University and Robert Jeffress of First Baptist Church in Dallas. Falwell invited him to speak at Liberty University, where he serves as president. In his introduction, Falwell told the students, “In my opinion, Donald Trump lives a life of loving and helping others as Jesus taught in the great commandment.”