Trump’s ban on refugees is ‘not a Bible issue’ says Rev. Franklin Graham

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Renowned Church leader Reverend Franklin Graham has opposed the trending evangelical condemnation at US President’s Trump’s ban on refugees. Rev. Franklin, son of celebrated evangelist Billy Graham extended support for the newly inaugurated President’s decision. He asserted that President’s strategy to thwart refugees’ flow from war-torn Syria into the US was “not a Bible issue”.

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“I think it can be better. There are some very dangerous people in the world today, especially coming out of the Middle East. We live in a very dangerous world and I think the president’s first priority is to protect the American people and until there is a better system in place for vetting and knowing who comes into America, I believe every person who comes unto the US should be vetted. We need to know who they are and what they believe, if they share the same core values of freedom and liberty,” Rev. Franklin Graham said.

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This ban would prohibit refugees and migrants from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia, and Yemen from entering the United States. It is believed that Christians and other religious minorities from these countries are exempted from the temporary ban. Followed by Reverend Franklin Graham’s comments about the ban; evangelical leaders have heaped condemnation on his remarks.

US President to temporarily suspend all asylum applications and ban Syrian refugees indefinitely, in the name of ‘national security.’ The draft order, entitled “Protecting the Nation From Terrorist Attacks by Foreign Nationals”, stipulates that after the 120-day period, refugees will continue to be banned if they come from countries that do not have “adequate safeguards” against terrorism. These safeguards will be determined by the secretaries of state and homeland security and the director of national intelligence.

The total number of number of refugees to be allowed in 2017 will be reduced from 110,000 to 50,000, while preference will continue to go to “religious minorities,” these religious minorities are most likely to be Christians facing persecution in the Middle East.