UN’s silence over genocide of Christians slammed by ACLJ

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American Center for Law and Justice has questioned the silence of United Nations Human Rights Council over the genocide of Christians at the hands of terror group Islamic State. UN body was also criticized for not formally identifying Christians and other religious minorities as victims of genocide in areas affected by Islamic State’s terror.

Genocide of Christians in Syria

It was further stated that despite well-documented evidence, the UN is reluctant to recognize the plight of Christians and other minorities. American Centre for Law and Justice in partnership with the European Center for Law and Justice, stated: “A declaration by the Human Rights Council that the Islamic State is engaged in genocide and action by this Council calling for the U.N. General Assembly (and other appropriate organs of the U.N.) to follow suit would carry significant weight.

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“We need action now. The U.N. must defend the rights of all religious minorities, including the Christians in Iraq, Syria, and any other place where the Islamic State engages in genocide,” American Centre for Law and Justice stated.

Our written statement outlined the genocidal acts against Christians and other religious minorities in Syria and Iraq occurring at the hands of the Islamic State (ISIS), and requested that the United Nations take immediate action by formally recognizing these groups as victims of genocide.

In the nine long months since we submitted our testimony, ISIS has continued its systematic reign of terror against these groups, while the United Nations has remained silent. The victims who managed to survive and escape captivity languish in refugee camps.

In October, when Allied forces began their campaign to liberate the Nineveh region of Iraq from the grips of ISIS, some Christian leaders were able to return to their ancient homeland for the first time in over two years. Having fled for their lives when ISIS took over the region in 2014, the leaders returned to piles of rubble. The 300,000 Christians who resided in the region when ISIS brutally took over the region has now dwindled to 20 to 30 Christian residents. Their places of worship, ancient texts, and congregations have summarily been wiped out by ISIS.

As more ISIS-held regions are liberated in the coming months, more evidence will undoubtedly reveal the indisputable genocidal acts by ISIS against religious minorities. The growing body of evidence demonstrates that the inhuman violence at issue is, in fact, genocide. This evidence is well-documented, and it is sickening.”